Image credit: Before It’s Too Late

The way things are going now, it’s only a matter of time before augmented reality permeates every aspect of our lives, just like smartphones. It’s likely that the only thing preventing this mass adoption is the availability and sophistication of the development tools to create for the medium.

That said, one of the fastest ways to develop a new method of conveying information is through art. Television and the internet proved that art, and consequently advertising, can be a driving factor in adoption of new technology. Better shows means more people watching TV. And more people watching TV means more advertising dollars. And more advertising dollars means better TV. It’s a cycle.

Fans of mixed reality then should be happy to see the Miami-based artist Linda Cheung creating an augmented reality mural project that taps into the emotional aspect of climate change. Already a politically-charged issue, you’re unlikely to find anyone on the planet who doesn’t have an opinion about this sensitive subject.

From a marketing perspective, Cheung’s choice to focus on climate change for her exhibit is brilliant. Users are treated to an interactive experience when they look at Cheung’s exhibit through their smartphone. A play on the classic “Miami” sign, Linda’s version features a massive Xanax tablet where the “I” would be along with an “M” covered in gaudy diamonds. 

Users can then choose whether or not to make a change towards the attitude of climate change. If they select “make no change,” then they’re treated to a dystopian future with collapsed buildings covered in overgrowth. If they choose “be the change,” then the future looks more promising — renewable energy sources and clean streets are their reward. 

The exhibit is meant to evoke thought and emotion around the topic of climate change. Regardless of where individuals stand on the topic, the fact remains that through Cheung’s clever use of augmented reality, more people are being exposed to the subject than would have been otherwise. And for the augmented reality as a whole, that’s a good thing.

What do you think about Linda Cheung’s augmented reality art exhibit in Miami? Let us know in a comment!

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